Martin Triipan

Partner

Head of Regulatory

Estonia

+372 503 0926

Martin Triipan is a partner with wide experience almost exclusively in environmental and planning law and is, therefore, one of the very few truly specialised lawyers in these fields in Estonia. His practical experience includes advising clients on complex environmental liability questions, often supporting the other practice areas of the firm in property transactions. He is also recognised as one of the most experienced litigators in the field.

In addition, Martin is active in legislative drafting — he has participated in the codification of the Estonian Environmental Law and has written on various environmental law-related issues in a number of local and international publications.

Martin Triipan was awarded the title Lawyer of the Year at the Estonian Bar Association’s 100th anniversary ceremony in 2019.

Martin Triipan has a busy practice in the real estate space, with recent work advising on transactions, construction and planning matters in connection with energy and transport infrastructure projects. He is also well placed to act on contentious mandates, with a proven track record in handling real estate disputes.

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2005

University of Tartu, Estonia

Master of Laws (LL.M.)

2001

University of Tartu, Estonia

Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.), officially equivalent to MA

2002

Estonian Bar Association

2001-2002

Estonian Moot Court Society

Board Member

2001

Estonian Academic Law Society

2001

Estonian Moot Court Society

2019

Juridica: "How Long Should Waste be Tracked? By-products and End-of-waste Status"
In the field of waste, modern environmental law must tackle two seemingly contradictory challenges at the same time: it must protect people and the environment against risks arising from waste as much as possible, while simultaneously enabling the use of waste as a resource to the largest possible extent. On the one hand, a broad approach to the concept of waste helps to protect people and the environment because it allows public authorities to monitor what happens with waste to the greatest possible extent. However, in the same way that surveillance activities in criminal proceedings extensively infringe upon the rights of individuals, a concept of waste that is too broad may prevent the goals of a circular economy from being achieved. The article examines this problem in the context of the definition of waste, the concepts of by-products and end-of-waste status, and a few recent court decisions.

2017

Yearbook of Estonian courts 2016

2015

Comments to General Part of Environmental Code Act (2015)

Comments to General Part of Environmental Code Act. (2015)

2014

Estonian Environmental Law Center

Comments to General Part of Environmental Code Act.

2008

The International Comparative Legal Guide to: Environment Law 2008. UK Global Legal Group Ltd. (Estonian chapter)

Estonian Chapter UK: Global Legal Group Ltd. 2008

2007

The International Comparative Legal Guide to: Environment Law 2007. UK: Global Legal Group Ltd. (Estonian chapter)

Estonian Chapter UK: Global Legal Group Ltd. 2007

2006

The Principle of Proportionality in European Union Law. Juridica, 3, 151–158

Juridica, 3, 151-158 (in Estonian) 2006

2001

The Principle of Proportionality in the Constitutional and Administrative Law. Juridica, 5, 305–313 (in Estonian)

Juridica, 5, 305-313 (in Estonian) 2001